Retail Planning Is More Complex Than Ever

Retailing: From A to Z by Joel Evans

In this tough economic environment, retailers need all the help that they can get. So, an excellent article from Wilson Perumal & Company on “Complexity in Retail: Why Companies Must Adapt in Order to Survive” is particularly timely.
According to Wilson Perumal: “We’re living in a time of incredible business complexity. Retail was perhaps the industry most affected by growing complexity in recent years – retailers that learned to master good complexity and limit the impact of bad complexity, gained a competitive advantage and beat their competitors. In the past, retailing was a relatively simple business:   You selected the right product range, bought the selected products at the lowest possible price and at the right quantities, merchandized the products in your stores, managed stock availability with supply chain efficiency and marketing efforts, and at the end of the retail cycle you exited old lines with minimal cannibalization. Simple. This simplicity allowed companies…

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Google to open flagship retail stores by end of 2013

Retail News

Apple and Microsoft both have their own, dedicated retail stores. Can Google be far behind? If the rumors are true, the answer is “not at all,” with the first Google stores due to open by the end of this year.

Citing “an extremely reliable source,” the gossipmongers at 9to5Google report that the Chocolate Factory is hard at work on plans to open its own flagship stores in “major metropolitan areas” in time for this year’s holiday season.

The stores will reportedly highlight Google’s Nexus devices, the Chrome browser, Chromebooks, and other new products to come, with an emphasis on giving prospective customers the chance to get hands-on with Googly kit before they buy.

About those aforementioned new products: according to 9to5Google’s source, foremost among them will be Glass, the Chocolate Factory’s much-ballyhooed experiment in wearable computing – which makes some sense, considering that few customers are likely to be willing…

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Apples retail strategy

TechCrunch

Apple is a unique company in that even if you break down its individual lines of business and view them as distinct from the whole, it can still be regarded as immensely successful in a number of different areas. As a hardware company, it’s a success; as a software and services provider, it’s a success; and as a retail chain, it’s a success. And Apple’s physical retail presence shows such steady upwards growth that it, rather than any product, could be the site of the company’s greatest innovation over the next few years.

Speaking at a Goldman Sachs investor conference on Tuesday, Cook went into detail about Apple’s retail plans, addressing the growth and success of the company’s stores, as well as plans for expansion and changes to their deployment strategy for 2013. Asymco’s Horace Dediu visualized the numbers shared, charting the progress of key metrics like store openings…

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Customer Loyalty Startup Front Flip Raises $3.75 Million For Its Digital Scratch Cards Platform

Scratchies for smart phones rewards! Clever.

TechCrunch

Although a number of mobile customer loyalty and rewards companies have debuted over the years, a good many of these new efforts have been focused on taking the offline concept of the 10-hole punch card and transitioning it to mobile. Another startup called Front Flip, which today is announcing $3.75 million in Series B funding, has a different take on loyalty – it wants to make these programs more fun, and more like a game you play than a task to complete.

This latest round of funding comes from Peter Brown (former chairman and CEO of AMC Entertainment), Gary Fish (CEO of FishNet Security), Lance Melber (sold eSmartLoan.com to Capital One for $155 million), and the Brandmeyer Family (founded and sold Enturia to Cardinal Health for $490 million).

FF_Unopened_GiftThe year-old company was started by brothers Sean (CEO) and Matt Becker (head of product), the former a serial entrepreneur and…

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